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The Kemet Cameo Collection

Jewelry designed by 

   Reba & Clinton Crawford

 

Our African jewelry collection has developed over the years to meet the needs of women attracted to classical and contemporary African style.  Our signature piece is a cameo featuring the profile of a most significant woman in ancient history, Queen Nefertiti of Egypt's 18th Dynasty.  We have also connected our designs with sub-Saharan Africa.  Cowrie shells, Akua'ba figures, masks, Asante spirals, Ethiopian crosses, etc make up a significant part of our collection.  A unique feature of our work is that we have incorporated stones, shells, bones, sand and glass beads, and even rhinestones to add a modern touch to the traditional quality of African art.  We describe the concept behind our pieces as ancient beauty for modern royalty.  We hope that you boldly wear them with distinction.

 

Cameos & Pins

Nefertiti Cameo - Item No. KC01 - $60.00

Queen Nefertiti of ancient Kemet (Egypt) was not just another beautiful face.  She was addressed by her people as "Ruler of the Nile," and it is believed that she wielded major religious and political power in her day.  She is the stepmother of King Tutankhamen (aka King Tut).  It was during the reign of the 18th Dynasty with her husband, Pharaoh Akhenaton, that the practice of monotheism was re-established in Egypt.

Approx. 2¼" x 17/8"

 

                                             Scroll down to bottom of page for Order Form


Nefertiti Pin - Item No. NP01 - $25.00

This smart little pin also features Queen Nefertiti. 

 

Approx. 1½" x 1¼"

 

 


Akua'ba Doll Pin - Item No. ADP01- $25.00

Among the Akan people of Ghana, the Akua’ba (fertility) figure has quite an interesting story.  Legend reveals that a woman named Akua had difficulty conceiving a child. She commissioned a wooden figure called Akuaba and cared for it like a real baby.  The women of the village called the figure "Akua’s child" but subsequently Akua indeed became pregnant.   Since she bore a daughter, Akuaba primarily represents the female.  Even today, women in Ghana who desire a child will carry an Akuaba sculptural figure to encourage conception.

 

Approx. 2¾" x 1¼"

 

 


Nut Goddess Pin - Item No. NGP01 - $20.00

Nut (pronounced noot) was one of the pantheon of gods in ancient Egypt.  She personified the heavens.  The cycle of night and day came through her as she swallowed the sun at the end of the day (causing darkness) and gave  birth to it again (causing daylight).  

Approx. 2¼"

 

 


Farmer's Mask Pin - Item No. FMP01 - $25.00

Masks have always had great significance in African cultures

and the Farmer’s Mask is no exception.  During certain ceremonies, celebrations, or rituals, masks represent either a male or female, however, the dancers who wear them are almost always male.  The Farmer’s Mask is used in asking for or giving thanks for a bountiful harvest.

 

Approx. 2½" x 7/8"

 

 


African Bar Pin - Item No. ABP01 - $25.00

 

Among the art of many African cultures, special objects such as scepters, utensils, musical instruments, etc., were created to convey the status of members of the royal court.  This pin inspired by Africa’s royal art is enhanced with natural cowrie shells that also denote prominence and stature.

 

Approx. 3" x ¾"

 

 

Necklaces

Cowrie Necklace (red) - Item No. CN02 - $35.00

Cowrie Necklace (crystal) - Item No. CN03 - $35.00 - Out of Stock

Cowrie shells are an important feature in African art, design and rituals.  On masks and other significant objects, they are used to denote prominence and stature.  Once bartered as currency in some African cultures, cowrie shells are also known to symbolize fertility.  In addition, they are used by healers and diviners to determine one's destiny. Women in African cultures as far-reaching as ancient Egypt and Nubia wore belts made with cowrie shells cast in gold.  You too can wear them with distinction.

Approx. 16" 

 

 

Touch image with mouse to see

 Item No. CN03


3-Spiral Necklace - Item No.  SpN01- $30.00

Circular shapes are significant in African art and culture.  Among the  Asante (pronounced A-shan-ti) people  of Ghana and many other African ethnic groups, one of the references of the spiral is the unbroken cycle of life.

 

Approx. 17½"

 

 


Cartouche Pendant - Item No. CTP01 ("Ma'at") - $22.00

Cartouche Pendant - Item No. CTP02 ("Hotep") - $22.00 (not shown)

The shenu (cartouche) is a prevalent symbol on the ancient temple walls in Egypt.  It usually bears the name of a pharaoh or other member of the ruling class written in hieroglyphs.  Ma'at means truth, justice, balance and reciprocity (which was the the guiding principle ancient Egyptians lived by). Hotep means peace.

 

 

Approx. 21" (cord)

 

 


Mudfish Necklace - Item No. MN01 - $30.00

In the art of Benin, West Africa, the mudfish symbolizes the divinity of the oba (king), as it is a creature that can mediate between water and land.  The oba is viewed as semi-divine, as he has the ability to mediate between the natural world and the spiritual world. 

 

 


Crocodile Necklace - Item No. CRN01-$30.00

As with most African art, symbolism is key.  The crocodile lives in water, it also breathes air, therefore, it represents the ability to adapt to different circumstances.

 

 


Akua'ba Doll Pendant - Item No. ADPD01 - $25.00

Among the Akan people of Ghana, the Akua’ba (fertility) figure has quite an interesting story.  Legend reveals that a woman named Akua had difficulty conceiving a child. She commissioned a wooden figure called Akuaba and cared for it like a real baby.  The women of the village called the figure "Akua’s child" but subsequently Akua indeed became pregnant.   Since she bore a daughter, Akuaba primarily represents the female.  Even today, women in Ghana who desire a child will carry an Akuaba sculptural figure to encourage conception.

 

Approx. 23" (cord).  Also available as a pin (see above)

 

 


Ethiopian Cross Pendant - Item No. ECP01- $25.00

The Ethiopian Cross is one of the sacred symbols used among African peoples.  It traces its origin to the Egyptian ankh. The Christian church subsequently adopted the cross.  According to some historians, the cross, irrespective of what part of the world it is found in, has practically the same meaning—it symbolizes the life to come.

 

 

 

Cross approx. 2¾" x 1-7/8", cord approx. 23"

 

 


Ethiopian Cross Necklace - Item No. ECP02  - $22.00

Ethiopian Cross Necklace -  Item No. ECP03 - $22.00     (Touch image with mouse to see  Item No. ECP03)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item No. ECP02  Approx.  2" x 1" Cord, 19"

Item No. ECP03  Approx.  1¾"x 1-3/8", Cord, 22"

 

 

Touch image with mouse to see

 Item No. ECP03


Sankofa Pendant - Item No. SP01 - $25.00

A number of symbols called Adinkra among the Akan people of Ghana represent proverbs.  Sankofa means "Go back and fetch it."  It is not taboo to go back and fetch what you lost in order to move forward.  It is the symbol of the wisdom in learning from the past to build for the future.

 

Approx. 2⅛" x 2¾", cord approx. 23"

 

 


Spiral Necklace - Item No. SpN02 - $30.00

 

Circular shapes are significant in African art and culture.  Among the  Asante (pronounced

A-shan-ti) people  of Ghana and many other African ethnic groups, one of the references of the spiral is the unbroken cycle of life.

 

 

Matching earrings (not shown) Item No. SpE03 - $12.00

Approx. 17"

 

 


Scarab Necklace - Item No. ScN01 - $25.00

Scarabs were considered sacred in ancient Egypt.  They represented rebirth and were worn as amulets to ward off evil and to provide a safe journey to the Afterlife.

 

 

Approx. 20"

 

 


Eye of Horus Necklace - Item No. EHN01 - $25.00

In ancient Egypt, the udjat (Eye of Horus) was designed to resemble the right eye of the Egyptian God, Horus.  The Eye of Horus was believed to have healing and protective power.  It was used as a protective amulet (to ward off the "evil eye") and as a medical measuring device, using the mathematical proportions of the eye to determine the proportions of ingredients in medicinal preparations.   

 

 

Approx. 20"

 

 


Nut Goddess Necklace - Item No. NGN01 - $25.00

Nut (pronounced noot) was one of the pantheon of gods in ancient Egypt.  She personified the heavens.  The cycle of night and day came through her as she swallowed the sun at the end of the day (causing darkness) and gave  birth to it again (causing daylight).  

 

Also available as a pin- Item No.  NGP01 - $20.00 

Approx. 20"

 

 

Earrings

Cowrie Earrings (post) - Item No. CE02 - $22.00 

 

 

 

Approx. 1" x 3/8"

 

Note:  Item is available with ruby red (shown), rainbow "crystal" or black Czech glass beads.     Please specify color when ordering

 

 


Spiral Earrings (clip-on) - Item no. SpE01 - $15.00

Circular shapes are significant in African art and culture.  Among the  Asante (pronounced A-shan-ti) people  of Ghana and many other African ethnic groups, one of the references of the spiral is the unbroken cycle of life.

Approx. 2¼"

 

 


Spiral Earrings - Item no. SpE02 - $15.00

 

Circular shapes are significant in African art and culture.  Among the  Asante (pronounced A-shan-ti) people  of Ghana and many other African ethnic groups, one of the references of the spiral is the unbroken cycle of life.

 

 

 

 

Approx. 2"

 

 


Akua'ba Doll Earrings - Item No. ADE01 - $12.00

Among the Akan people of Ghana, the Akua’ba (fertility) figure has quite an interesting story.  Legend reveals that a woman named Akua had difficulty conceiving a child. She commissioned a wooden figure called Akuaba and cared for it like a real baby.  The women of the village called the figure "Akua’s child" but subsequently Akua indeed became pregnant.   Since she bore a daughter, Akuaba primarily represents the female.  Even today, women in Ghana who desire a child will carry an Akuaba sculptural figure to encourage conception.

Approx. 1½"

 

 


Eye of Horus Earrings - Item No. EHE01 - $15.00

In ancient Egypt, the udjat (Eye of Horus) was designed to resemble the right eye of the Egyptian God, Horus.  The Eye of Horus was believed to have healing and protective power.  It was used as a protective amulet (to ward off the "evil eye") and as a medical measuring device, using the mathematical proportions of the eye to determine the proportions of ingredients in medicinal preparations.   

Approx. 1" x 1-1/8"

 

 


King Tutankhamen Earrings (post)  - Item No. KTE01 $12.00

Pharaoh Tutankhamen came into power as a child during Egypt's 18th Dynasty.  He is probably most noted for the cache of gold and other treasures amassed from his tomb in the early 20th century. Unfortunately, he died young and was not allowed to realize his full potential as Egypt's leader.

Approx. 3/8" x ½".   Also available as a hanging earring.

 

 


Scarab Earrings (post) - Item No. ScE01 - $12.00

Scarabs were considered sacred in ancient Egypt.  They represented rebirth and were worn as amulets to ward off evil and to provide a safe journey to the Afterlife.

Approx. 3/8" x ½".   Also available as a hanging earring.

 

 


Nefertiti Earrings  - Item No. NE01 - $15.00

Queen Nefertiti of ancient Kemet (Egypt) was not just another beautiful face.  She was addressed by her people as "Ruler of the Nile," and it is believed that she wielded major religious and political power in her day.  It was during the 18th Dynasty reign with her husband, Pharaoh Akhenaton, that the practice of monotheism was re-established in Egypt.

 

Approx. 2"

 

 

Key Chains

Akua'aba Key Chain - Item No. AKC-01 - $10.00

Among the Akan people of Ghana, the Akua’ba (fertility) figure has quite an interesting story.  Legend reveals that a woman named Akua had difficulty conceiving a child. She commissioned a wooden figure called Akuaba and cared for it like a real baby.  The women of the village called the figure "Akua’s child" but subsequently Akua indeed became pregnant.   Since she bore a daughter, Akuaba primarily represents the female.  Even today, women in Ghana who desire a child will carry an Akuaba sculptural figure to encourage conception.

 

Approx. 4" (including length of chain)

 

 

Bracelets

Spiral Charm Bracelet - Item No. SpB01 - $15.00

Circular shapes are significant in African art and culture.  Among the  Asante (pronounced A-shan-ti) people  of Ghana and many other African ethnic groups, one of the references of the spiral is the unbroken cycle of life.

 

   

Approx. 7¼"

 

 

Cowrie Cuff Bracelet - Item No. CCB01 - $25.00

Cowrie shells are an important feature in African art, design and rituals.  On masks and other significant objects, they are used to denote prominence and stature.  Once bartered as currency in some African cultures, cowrie shells are also known to symbolize fertility.  In addition, they are used by healers and diviners to determine one's destiny. Women in African cultures as far-reaching as ancient Egypt and Nubia wore belts made with cowrie shells cast in gold.  You too can wear them with distinction.

Adjustable cuff.

 

 

NOTE:  Some glass beads and stones used may vary in size and/or shape as they are subject to availability. They are also available in other colors.  Please inquire.  We also have other wonderful pieces in our collection.  We may even have what you don't see here...just ask.

Click here for order form  

                              

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All Rights Reserved.

Website last updated:  03/31/2016

Sankofa World Publishers

P.O. Box 473592

   Brooklyn, New York 11247

      Ph. (718)756-8904